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Free Shipping over $39
Ships Free

If your order is more than $39, it ships FREE anywhere in New Zealand, including rural addresses. It's as simple as that.

Ships fast

Free shipping doesn't have to be slow shipping! We provide:

  • Next working day delivery for all North Island addresses.
  • Two working day or faster delivery for all South Island addresses.
No Exclusions

Even big or heavy items ship free. If your order total is $39 or more, the shipping is on us!

You can learn more in our free shipping policy

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Tips for looking after your pet when moving house

Moving house is usually stressful for everyone involved, and that includes your pet. In all the upheaval, imagine what it’s like for your animal friends, with their normal routine gone and everyone preoccupied with different things. Your pet’s familiar world – smells, favourite sleeping spots and household objects – has changed dramatically, and it may find it hard to cope. Here’s how to make the moving experience less stressful for your pets.

General tips

Keep your pet away from the moving activity by confining it to a room where it will feel safe and can’t escape. Tell the movers where your pet is so they don’t inadvertently let it out.

Alternatively, put your pet in a boarding kennel or cattery for the duration of the move. Remember to make sure its vaccinations, worming and flea treatments are up to date.

Unpack and get organised before turning your pet loose in your new home. Initially, keep the doors to extra rooms closed and slowly give your pet access to them as it becomes accustomed to its new home.

During the transition from an old home to a new one, pets can sometimes escape or become stressed. Try to remain calm and provide as much routine, comfort and security as you can for them.

 

Moving house with cats

Possibly the pet that will take the most time to adjust is your cat! It’s a good idea to have your cat micro-chipped and registered with the New Zealand Companion Animal Register – a lost cat can be scanned for a microchip by any vet or animal rescue organisation and their owner contacted. If your cat is already registered, make sure your contact details are updated with the registry. Organise a new tag for your cat’s collar with its name, the new home phone number and your mobile number so that it’s ready for the big move.

Use a sturdy, comfortable pet carrier large enough for your cat to stand up, turn around and lie down in. This will provide a safe, escape-proof haven while travelling.

Remove food and water a few hours before you leave as your cat may become nervous and vomit, urinate or defecate when stressed. Take a supply of water from home if you’re travelling a long distance.

When you get to your new home, designate a spare room that you can close off and set up with food, a litter tray, bed and toys.

Once the movers have left and you’re settled for the evening, let your cat explore the rest of the house – remember to keep external doors and windows shut. It’s best to keep your cat indoors for one to two weeks to get used to the new home. When your cat goes outside for the first time, monitor its progress as it explores its new surroundings.

Forget the old wives’ tale of putting butter on your cat’s paws – that will just create messy carpets and floors!

 

Moving house with dogs

If possible, check out the new property for any potential problems ahead of the move. Are the perimeter fences secure enough to stop your dog escaping into an unfamiliar neighbourhood?

If you’re moving to a new city, cancel your current dog registration and re-register with your new council. Make sure your contact details are updated with the microchip registry and organise a new tag with your dog’s name, the new home phone number and your mobile number.

Most councils provide directions to off-leash parks and beaches. Find out where these are in your new neighbourhood before you move. Dogs can get carsick too, so don’t feed or water your pet for a few hours before you leave your old home.

Depending on the size of your dog, you might want to use a pet carrier. Choose one that’s sturdy, comfortable and roomy enough for your dog to move around in.

If you’re travelling a long distance, make frequent stops to water and exercise your dog, and always keep it on a leash for its own protection. If your car doesn’t have air conditioning, keep the windows down low enough for air to circulate but high enough for your dog to stay in the car. 

When you arrive at your new home, designate a secure area/room for your dog while you unpack. Provide water, a bed and some toys.

Your dog will need exercise at some point during the day, so take it for an on-leash walk around your new neighbourhood. At the end of the day, take a walk around the house and garden with your dog at your side, so you can explore your new surroundings together without your pet becoming too overwhelmed.

Moving house is usually stressful for everyone involved, and that includes your pet. In all the upheaval, imagine what it’s like for your animal friends, with their normal routine gone and everyone preoccupied with different things. Your pet’s familiar world – smells, favourite sleeping spots and household objects – has changed dramatically, and it may find it hard to cope. Here’s how to make the moving experience less stressful for your pets. 

 

Air travel with pets

If you’re flying, you’ll need to find a professional pet transporter you feel comfortable and confident with. Your pet transporter will tell you everything you need to do, but don’t be afraid to ask more questions. If the move is taking you overseas, be aware that different countries have different quarantine restrictions, and that when you return to New Zealand, the quarantine restrictions depend on the country you are returning from.

The Pet.co.nz Team

Written by The Pet.co.nz Team

A team of specialists with backgrounds in animal nursing, animal care, and all things pet related.